Drug policy fails – again

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Another kick in the teeth this week for Theresa May and her determined squeal that drugs policy is working. After ignoring the research-based recommendations from a group of cross-party peers concerning decriminalisation, then developing selective deafness towards her drugs advisory board by banning khat, Theresa seems fixated on perpetuating the War On Drugs, whether anyone agrees with her or not.

It will be interesting, then, to see how she reacts to the news that cannabis psychosis admissions have actually increased since the drug was reclassified as a Class B substance. Yep, you’ve got us there, Theresa, you font of knowledge for all things street – clearly drugs policy is reducing use and minimising harm just as it should. Well done for sticking to your guns, and thank god those running the country know what they’re talking about. Phew.

Tottering Tory Totty aside, I have to admit this is a pretty bizarre finding. At no point did I think that reclassifying the drug would decrease the harm caused – why would it, it’s still illegal and that didn’t put people off before – but the inverted correlation between cannabis-related psychosis hospital admissions and reclassification of the drug is difficult to explain.

I have been pondering on this. Without subscribing to the Journal of Drug Policy (which is, I have to admit, surprisingly tempting, but takes money, of which I have little), I can’t see whether participants who suffered psychotic admissions had taken solely cannabis. My hunch is that something different may be afoot here. Rates of psychosis amongst my client-group have gone through the roof since MCat has surfaced, and I have heard similar reports from prisons regarding synthetic cannabanoids. I know that, until very recently, and certainly not within the confined dates of this longitudinal study, testing facilities for these drugs had not been developed – and even if they had, the average mental health ward would not have had access to them. So, my sneaky conclusion is that the increased rates of psychosis admission may have been due to the use of other substances – which were not only impossible to detect, but were also legal at the time and so potentially not reported or classified.

That is my suspicion. Just don’t tell Theresa. I can’t wait to see what shit she spins to explain away this one. Although, to be fair, I think she’s more likely to get a bad case of tinnitus than indulge in any scientific analysis. You keep on trucking girl, we’re all behind you (with a metaphorical spade).

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