The end of the Road

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

Some interesting updates on previous articles have appeared in the news this week.

Silk Road has finally been taken offline, and the alleged administrator, the pseudonymed Dread Pirate Roberts, has been arrested. The website appears to have been a one-man operation based in San Fransisco. The suspect, Ross William Ulbricht, kept his operations so secretive that his housemates knew him only as Josh, the guy who spent all his time in his room on his computer, and the FBI had to scour years of data to find very rare glitches in his online personas in order to identify him. It was only when a package containing fake IDs were seized at the Canadian border with Ulbricht’s picture on them, that investigators linked this to online activity – Dread Pirate Roberts had asked for advice on gaining fake identities to set up more servers. Given that Silk Road had a estimated $1.2 million worth of trading each month, and the FBI have seized $3.6 million worth of Bitcoin during the operation, it is astounding that Ulbricht has evaded identification and capture for so long. I wonder whether the US authorities will now power on with their War On Drugs and hunt down his suppliers and customers..

It will also be interesting to see whether previous Silk Road customers see a decline in the quality of their purchases now they have lost access to the Ebay-style seller rating system.. If there are any ex-customers out there, I would love for you to get in touch and let me know how you are buying your drugs now and what impact this has had on you.

Following on from last week’s blog about the normalisation of alcohol, a couple of interesting articles have been suggested to me by staff at Sheffield University. The first informed me of the alcohol industry-driven marketing concept that is Arthur’s Day. The producers of Guinness launched this national event in Ireland four years ago to ‘celebrate Arthur Guinness’, and then refused to accept any responsibility when alcohol-related ambulance call-outs increased by thirty percent. This somewhat sinister celebration, cleverly timed six months after St Patrick’s Day and on the busiest drinking night of the month (Thursday – student night, 26th – payday), has been described by some as exploitation of Irish culture for capitalist gain – and the way it has been embraced by the public suggests that alcohol marketing is even more powerful and socially influential than anyone could have predicted. (Apart from the Dr Evil-style masterminds at Guiness, obviously.)

This seems somewhat in conflict with the Irish health minister’s claim today that he wants to ‘denormalise’ tobacco use, and achieve a ‘tobacco-free state’ by 2025. Yet another example of policy-makers’ bizarre lack of parity between substances. Given that the Irish Government are encouraring Arthur’s Day as a tourist opportunity, I’m guessing from this that they would take a different approach to smoking were Marlborough produced in Galway…

The second article recommended looked at the normalisation of women’s alcohol use in the UK. It presents some scary facts about women’s health, and considers how the pressures of being a working mum are influencing alcohol intake. Again, it is pointed out that wine is sociably acceptable whilst cooking, and suggests we really need to question what has become ‘normal’ behaviour. It does make me wonder whether our kids think we drink that like all the time, been as that’s all they see of us. And with our young women drinking more than any others in the western world, maybe we need to look at ourselves and the patterns our children emulate.

And finally – I know you will all have seen this, so I will be brief – in a brave move which may mean he does himself out of a job, Chief of Police Mike Barton has stated that decriminalisation is the way forward. Drawing a clear division between drug dealers and drug users, Mike is making a bigger statement than many of us realise, given that many Police targets focus on homogenising and prosecuting anyone associated with drugs because ‘drugs are bad’. Mike draws the same comparisons that have been previously drawn here between the War On Drugs and alcohol prohibition in 1920s America – instead of stopping the trade, it routes the profits directly to criminals. It’s a relief to know that the frontline last bastion of the moral crusade, the Police, are willing to make their voices heard – instead of, as with the Police in 20s America, seeing the battle as a way of either lining their own pockets or buying their way into heaven. I think it is an honest and altruistic move by Mike, one which may well both damage his career and sit him outside his peer group, but I for one am heartened by his stance.

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One comment on “The end of the Road

  1. Jamie says:

    Good blog summary, the realities of alcohol in British society are obviously hidden consciously given the recent posts relating to the consumption being a significant excess compared to the amount sold…
    More interestingly and somewhat sad, is the interruption of Silk Road … Whilst there are the tabloid headlines and possible undesirable use of the road by a percentage of travellers … When it comes to substance use, what a shame ! Whether it be anarchy in action (in the best sense of the word) or a success of a real free market economy , silk road appeared to be becoming the best tool for quality assurance in relation to safer supply of substances . Unfortunately what may be hailed a some form aof success for the powers that be , the majority of users trading through Silk Road may now find themselves again hanging around local street corners , communities may be again devastated by small time drug lords and wannabe gangsters and quality of supplied substances again will have no checks and measures… A definite win for the powerful and successful but possibly a greater loss and cost to the every day user….. Bring it back and support a constructive aim of sorts me thinks

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