Archive for December, 2013

Comment from follower

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

This comment, sent by a follower of my blog, is both and informative and hilarious enough for me to want to share it with you all. I couldn’t agree more – or put it more eloquently.

Uruguay have today / yesterday moved to legislate about cannabis and take the trade out of the black market.. What with this and the crude and brash capitalist stance of Colorado and Washington Teresa May is worth a shot at this time I reckon or at least the superficial nature of her tenure .. If she can’t do a proper turd get her off the pot , we are losing money in austere times and disabling the true opportunity of capitalism via her policies – she is even crap at being a Tory !

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Stick reclassification up your K-hole

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

The Government are now considering upgrading ketamine to Class B, as they have just realised it is popular and causes bladder damage. Fingers on the pulse again there, guys. Not only did they miss the original ketamine boom which took place years ago when I was a student (and spent a considerable amount of time watching people slumped in corners wondering why anyone would want to do that to themselves) – and then miss the more recent frenzy which occurred a few years ago in the wake of MCat legislation – but by increasing the penalties for possessing the drug, the Advisory Council for the Misuse of Drugs have very much missed the point. The people who are taking ketamine daily and dissolving their urinary tracts are not going to stop just because the label is changed, or they are told they are now very naughty. They will just be less likely to disclose their use to anyone in the health profession, and their treatment will be less timely, less effective and more expensive.

It’s not exactly breaking news that ketamine causes significant health problems, either. The impact on the bladder is well-documented, and very young people are also being found to have irreversible damage to their kidneys, liver and brain. It’s not that I don’t think these facts need to be made more available – which I’m sure is the Government’s intention – it’s just that the last fifty years of prohibition have proved that the punitive method just does not work.

And I wonder, if there is any other policy which had failed so dramatically, and which had caused so much harm as a by-product? Why would any political organisation continue to implement a method so poor at achieving its targets?

I have been told not to bitch about Theresa May any more as apparently it has started to sound like a personal vendetta – but if she had listened to me on the khat issue, maybe her bumbling drug policies wouldn’t get her into so much trouble. Under pressure last week to reverse the ban, Khat Woman herself has been accused of implementing legislation without any supporting evidence, and, in the process, potentially damaging relations with Kenya. As a Home Office report has pointed out, given that khat is not associated with any social or medical harm, and there was no consultation with the people who use, produce or import the drug, this may have been a somewhat rash and uneducated decision to make. It could, in fact, impact negatively on unemployment and crime figures, as livelihoods are destroyed, and has led to accusations of hypocrisy within a supposed free market.

Instead, Keith Vaz MP has recommended introducing a licensing system for the substance. So maybe Keith has been reading even if Theresa hasn’t.

If the UN trust politicians, should we trust them?

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Another international agency has formally documented its concerns about the UN’s data collection methods around international levels of drug use. In my article about Count The Costs’ Alternative World Drug Report, I mentioned that the UN’s report about drug use across the globe had been criticised for relying on government self-reporting – leaving opportunities for those in power to be less transparent than we might hope. Opaque, in fact.

This time, Harm Reduction International has released a formal challenge to the UN figures. This worldwide organisation claims that the data collected by the UN is incomparable to the 2008 data due to the difference in the methods of data collection, and that, again, government self-reporting is unreliable and unscientific. Given that over a third of the data set collected were done so by annual review questionnaires – completed by governments without any traceable references to how data was collected – analysis of the results is impossible given the lack of openness about how the figures were compiled.

Worryingly, it seems that some countries may be under-reporting their levels of drug use and HIV infection. Russia, for example, have reported that HIV rates amongst their injecting drug using population have almost halved in the last three years. Even considering why a country would want to do this feels quite sinister – but the potential impact on service provision for the drug users with the highest health needs within these countries is frightening.

Harm Reduction International have taken the decision to ignore the UN’s most recent global data, and instead continue to refer to the 2008 figures, where data collection methods were less subjective. They acknowledge that this data is out-dated but, until peer review of the data is possible, they feel the new data may misrepresent the actual international situation. They do, however, recommend that the data is considered on a country-to-country basis, as some countries have provided apparently sound figures.

I suppose this raises questions for me about the integrity of the United Nations and the standards of their publications, and the lack of power they apparently now have in extracting reliable data from politicians. This means that, instead of international agencies working together to tackle the global problems the drug trade produces, there are rifts between them – and confidence in the organisation central to finding some conclusions and solutions is weakened.

On a different note, I do also want to apologise here for my lack of consistency with my blogs recently, which I have otherwise been writing faithfully every week for the last year. I am pleased to say it is because I have some exciting new ventures afoot, which have been sapping me of my time and energy – but I am fully back on board now, pen poised, and will be bothering you with new posts yet again.

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