Archive for the ‘Drug testing’ Category

What do you like more: your drugs or your genitals?

Monday, January 13th, 2014

I know some of you probably think I was scare-mongering when I wrote Maurice the Feline, and I know there are many MCat users out there who take the drug without more than mild side-effects – but spare a thought for the poor sod who apparently came back from university for Christmas, took mephedrone, then stabbed his mother and cut off his own penis.

The story sounds bizarre, but national newspapers ran it and I can’t find anything disproving it. And I can’t say, in the time I have been working with mephedrone users, that it comes as a huge surprise to me. Despite some young MCat users responding with claims that “there’s no way MCat could do that”, I have seen the scary impact the drug can have on the mind. A serious psychotic episode, with no previous mental health history, is something I have unfortunately witnessed more than once – and that’s only from the cohort of people who come to the attention of drug services. I would imagine, behind closed doors, there are many people suffering from from paranoid and suicidal thoughts, and all the horrifying and damaging behaviours that come alongside them.

I am doing my best to set up some testing facilities – because, at the end of the day, no-one currently knows what they are taking. At least if you know something has not sent you crazy once, you have a greater chance of avoiding a negative experience thereafter. But please do not underestimate the potential this drug, or group of drugs, can have on your mental health. If you have any previous issues with your mental state, or any history of psychosis in your family, I would genuinely advise you to steer entirely clear – but, unfortunately, these factors are not strong enough indicators, in the case of this drug, that all will be well.

And as for the poor guy in the news – although I would not like having to heal the relationship with my mother after I’d tried to kill her, nor would I want to embark on a life with a mutilated, floppy todger, I would rather face either of these futures than live with paranoid psychosis. Let’s just hope he hasn’t triggered off something that lasts a lifetime.

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Random drug testing is ‘grievous and oppressive’

Sunday, January 5th, 2014

Drug testing is becoming an increasingly common phenomenon in the UK, and is gaining popularity both in workplaces and criminal justice systems. Agreeing to random drug tests is often a contractual requirement – no drug tests, no job – and refusal to provide a specimen is considered tantamount to a positive result by Police, social workers and employers.

It is therefore extremely interesting to hear that this week, in Florida, a Supreme Court has ruled that in all but exceptional circumstances, drug testing without justifiable suspicion of drug use is unlawful, and is only legal if it protects public safety.

The ruling was made in relation those in receipt of state benefits for childcare, so, whilst not directly transferable to our own systems, it may have future relevance – given that drug testing benefit claimants in the UK has already been mentioned in the Government’s recent poor-bashing campaign (scapegoating benefit claimants for bankers’ fuck-ups), and is only one step further than setting Jobcentre staff targets to stop payments, and making systems inaccessible so as to exclude more vulnerable recipients.

But the reasons for the ruling are very relevant here in the UK. In the first part, political attempts to align the poor with illegal drug use were thwarted when the court case revealed that only 2.6% of child benefit recipients tested had provided a positive sample. This percentage of illicit drug use was lower than in the general population.

Even more poignant were the legal challenges to random drug testing brought forward by the case, which was filed by a Navy veteran-turned-student whilst single-handedly caring for a disabled mother and young son. He refused a drugs test given there was no reasonable suspicion of drug use, and as a result had his claim for public assistance turned down. He won the case on the grounds that random drug testing is “unconstitutional”.

The judge deemed mandatory random testing outside the law because, under the Fourth Amendment of US Constitution, drug tests are classed as a search, and as such can only take place in response to suspicion that a crime has been committed. This law was introduced in 1700s when British search warrants enabled the colonists to enter and seize property at will. Fury at this lawful breach of human rights was thought to have started the Amercian Revolution. The resulting Declaration of Rights clearly stated that any searches on a person “whose offense is not particularly described and supported by evidence, are grievous and oppressive and ought not to be granted”.

How incredibly refreshing. Especially at a time when, in the UK, choices we make outside of work, which have no impact on our professional functioning, can mean we lose our jobs; or when a substance we used days ago, which has no effect on our ability to drive safely now, can mean we lose our driving license. Cannabis, a drug with a very weak relationship to social harm which is now legal in parts of America, can show up in urine tests for up to four weeks. Yet what, over such timescales, is the relationship to reduced ability or function, either in the workplace or behind the wheel?

I am sure that, forty years ago, employers felt that had a right to know the sexuality of their employees. Their choice not to employ homosexuals would have been supported by the authorities, despite this lifestyle choice having no impact on their professional capacity or any relevance in the workplace.

I hope this week’s ruling is the start of a thought revolution on the issue of drug use. What a person chooses to do behind closed doors should be private, unless this choice poses a risk to the other people. So in the case of drug use, unless an employer can evidence reduced productivity or increased risk as a result of suspected substance use, drug tests should not be carried out. Most employers condone, even support, the use of alcohol outside of work, despite use of this substance being well-documented to increase risk when operating machinery – the difference in the handling of the use of other drugs outside of work can therefore not be justifiably linked to risk.

This case is a reminder that we have human rights, a fact which seems to have been lost in this country where drug use is concerned. It is possession, not use, of a drug that is illegal. We cannot be arrested for having a drug in our system – yet we can lose our livelihood, without putting a foot wrong. That certainly strikes me as grievous and oppressive.

MCat testing

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

I have good news for the hundreds of people who have visited this site looking for information on mephedrone testing.

As I thought, instant, onsite MCat testing kits are not yet available. They are being developed, and I will let everyone know as soon as they come onto the market, but for now at least, if your employer uses the instant urine testing method, any MCat in your system will not show up on a drugs test.

(Your employer may use oral swabs, or send urine samples off to a laboratory – and MCat may be detectable using these methods. But if your employer takes a urine sample and gives an immediate result, you shouldn’t be providing a positive test – for now at least.)

However, this information is only useful if you are sure that it is actually MCat you have been taking – if it was different drug such as amphetamine, you would still give a positive result for this drug. And so I think I have managed to source some kits which test the drug itself, and tell you whether you have bought mephedrone, methylene, MDPV – or something else entirely. Whilst these won’t be able to tell you if you are clear of the drug before going back to work, they will be able to tell you if what you are taking is in fact mephedrone, or something else. So then you will know whether you will give an MCat-positive swab or lab result, or not.

Another good thing about these tests is they will allow you to test your drugs before you take them. If you have taken MCat before, you think you know how it affects you, and want the same effects, the safest way to take it again is to test a tiny sample to see if it is what you think it is. That way, you know what to expect, and you know what the potential side-effects may be and how to manage them. This also indicates that your supplier is probably trustworthy as they are selling what they claim to be selling. This makes the whole process safer, and less likely to put you into a state you weren’t expecting.

For information about the expected effects and side-effects of MCat, you can look at Frank or Know The Score. If you are in the UK, you can ring a confidential free phone number between 8am and 11pm (0800 5875879), but if you have serious concerns about the health of someone on mephedrone, you need to ring an ambulance immediately.

And bear in mind, if you are getting wasted at the weekend, not sleeping or eating, and turning up to work in such a state that you can’t do your job, you will still be subject to disciplinary procedures. There’s nothing wrong with having a good time – but it ain’t worth losing your livelihood for. And if you do have an accident at work and require a medical, any substances you have taken will still be identifiable via a blood test – so make sure you eat, sleep, rehydrate and straighten your head out before work.

The tests have been sourced from the same supplier as the Police, so I have every faith in their validity, but once I have set up an online check-out I will post again. In the meantime, if you are interested in purchasing the tests, or you want to know about testing kits for other drugs, email me at drugsworkertowriter@gmail.com. I promise to treat your information with the upmost respect and confidentiality, and will answer any queries you have as best I can.

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