Archive for the ‘MCat’ Tag

What do you like more: your drugs or your genitals?

Monday, January 13th, 2014

I know some of you probably think I was scare-mongering when I wrote Maurice the Feline, and I know there are many MCat users out there who take the drug without more than mild side-effects – but spare a thought for the poor sod who apparently came back from university for Christmas, took mephedrone, then stabbed his mother and cut off his own penis.

The story sounds bizarre, but national newspapers ran it and I can’t find anything disproving it. And I can’t say, in the time I have been working with mephedrone users, that it comes as a huge surprise to me. Despite some young MCat users responding with claims that “there’s no way MCat could do that”, I have seen the scary impact the drug can have on the mind. A serious psychotic episode, with no previous mental health history, is something I have unfortunately witnessed more than once – and that’s only from the cohort of people who come to the attention of drug services. I would imagine, behind closed doors, there are many people suffering from from paranoid and suicidal thoughts, and all the horrifying and damaging behaviours that come alongside them.

I am doing my best to set up some testing facilities – because, at the end of the day, no-one currently knows what they are taking. At least if you know something has not sent you crazy once, you have a greater chance of avoiding a negative experience thereafter. But please do not underestimate the potential this drug, or group of drugs, can have on your mental health. If you have any previous issues with your mental state, or any history of psychosis in your family, I would genuinely advise you to steer entirely clear – but, unfortunately, these factors are not strong enough indicators, in the case of this drug, that all will be well.

And as for the poor guy in the news – although I would not like having to heal the relationship with my mother after I’d tried to kill her, nor would I want to embark on a life with a mutilated, floppy todger, I would rather face either of these futures than live with paranoid psychosis. Let’s just hope he hasn’t triggered off something that lasts a lifetime.

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MCat testing

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

I have good news for the hundreds of people who have visited this site looking for information on mephedrone testing.

As I thought, instant, onsite MCat testing kits are not yet available. They are being developed, and I will let everyone know as soon as they come onto the market, but for now at least, if your employer uses the instant urine testing method, any MCat in your system will not show up on a drugs test.

(Your employer may use oral swabs, or send urine samples off to a laboratory – and MCat may be detectable using these methods. But if your employer takes a urine sample and gives an immediate result, you shouldn’t be providing a positive test – for now at least.)

However, this information is only useful if you are sure that it is actually MCat you have been taking – if it was different drug such as amphetamine, you would still give a positive result for this drug. And so I think I have managed to source some kits which test the drug itself, and tell you whether you have bought mephedrone, methylene, MDPV – or something else entirely. Whilst these won’t be able to tell you if you are clear of the drug before going back to work, they will be able to tell you if what you are taking is in fact mephedrone, or something else. So then you will know whether you will give an MCat-positive swab or lab result, or not.

Another good thing about these tests is they will allow you to test your drugs before you take them. If you have taken MCat before, you think you know how it affects you, and want the same effects, the safest way to take it again is to test a tiny sample to see if it is what you think it is. That way, you know what to expect, and you know what the potential side-effects may be and how to manage them. This also indicates that your supplier is probably trustworthy as they are selling what they claim to be selling. This makes the whole process safer, and less likely to put you into a state you weren’t expecting.

For information about the expected effects and side-effects of MCat, you can look at Frank or Know The Score. If you are in the UK, you can ring a confidential free phone number between 8am and 11pm (0800 5875879), but if you have serious concerns about the health of someone on mephedrone, you need to ring an ambulance immediately.

And bear in mind, if you are getting wasted at the weekend, not sleeping or eating, and turning up to work in such a state that you can’t do your job, you will still be subject to disciplinary procedures. There’s nothing wrong with having a good time – but it ain’t worth losing your livelihood for. And if you do have an accident at work and require a medical, any substances you have taken will still be identifiable via a blood test – so make sure you eat, sleep, rehydrate and straighten your head out before work.

The tests have been sourced from the same supplier as the Police, so I have every faith in their validity, but once I have set up an online check-out I will post again. In the meantime, if you are interested in purchasing the tests, or you want to know about testing kits for other drugs, email me at drugsworkertowriter@gmail.com. I promise to treat your information with the upmost respect and confidentiality, and will answer any queries you have as best I can.

Does MCat show up on a drugs test?

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

The main question that brings strangers to my blog is – does MCat show up on drug tests? I’m going to address this to the best of knowledge now, and if anyone has anything to add or knows any different, please leave a comment to inform others. There are some resources at the bottom for people wanting more information.

MCat, or mephedrone, is so called because of its chemical compound, 4-methylmethcathinone. It is just a happy coincidence that it smells like cat urine, hence sometimes being know as meow meow. Also known as mephedrone, it was originally marketed as plant food or bath salts so people could buy it without being detected, although it was never intended to be used as such. It seems to be able to be used as safely as other illicit drugs such as ecstacy. However, long-term effects are unknown, risks dramatically increased when used with other drugs, and I can say from my experience as a drugs worker that it can also be significantly, rapidly harmful to users’ mental health. It has also been described to me by more than one seasoned drug user as “more addictive than crack”. There have been various deaths linked to the drug.

In terms of drug testing, it IS now possible to test for mephedrone. It does, of course, depend on what you have actually taken – if you have bought it from a street dealer, it could be anything, and even substances bought via the Internet are not being monitored by Trading Standards and so might not be what you think you were buying. I have had loads of people tell me they have taken MCat, with widely-varying reports of the effects, and then test positive for amphetamine or methamphetamine, which have different chemical structures. I have even found a website which claims it can test for mephedrone using its methamphetamine testing kit (although I seriously doubt the validity of this). So be aware that, whatever you think you have taken, you could still flunk a drugs test.

In short, if you are being tested by your employer, it is possible that you could fail a drugs test after taking MCat. Basic testing windows for other stimulants (cocaine, amphetamine) are around two days in the bloodstream and five days in urine, so if you haven’t used any for a week you should be clear.

However, most standard workplace drug tests still do not test for MCat. It is, of course, possible that your employer is clued-up and has bought separate MCat testing kits, or has the samples sent off to the lab for detailed testing – and an article in the Welsh press this morning highlights that employers are becoming more aware of their staff using MCat – but the testing options are expensive, and my guess is your employer is just following their drugs and alcohol policy and covering their own backsides. Some drug services do now test for mephedrone, but some don’t.

If the test is via an oral swab (where a stick with cotton wool on is pressed against your gum or cheek for two minutes) then it is possible but unlikely to test for mephedrone, as, as far as I can gather, this test is only available via confirmation test (which costs about £30 per substance). Even if the lab did look for mephedrone, only the specific and original chemical compound would be detected. So in the case that the substance being used was some derivative of the original compound (such as any of those which flooded the market when mephedrone was made illegal to skirt legislation), then even if the sample was tested for MCat, it would still give a negative result. It is also possible to test for cathinone (khat), and given that mephedrone is a synthetic cathinone I thought this might also give a positive result for MCat, but on speaking to the lab this seems unlikely, as again the test only detects the specific chemical compound.

So if your employer or drugs worker is using oral fluid testing, it is unlikely but not impossible that you will give a positive result, unless they are willing to spend the money (for example, if they are testing as part of a court order). I’m not totally sure on testing windows for MCat, but given its short action and its similarity to amphetamine and other stimulants, I would hazard a guess that it only remains in the bloodstream (and so would be detectable through oral fluid testing) for a couple of days.

In terms of urine testing, again it is possible but not likely that employers will test for mephedrone. The mainstream-marketed dip-test strips or urine pots available for bulk-buying via the Internet do not test for MCat. Again, your employer could be on-the-ball, so there’s no way of ruling it out. Drugs will show up much longer in your urine than in your bloodstream, so if you have used MCat at the weekend it will probably still be present in your urine throughout your working week.

A good idea might be to get hold of your employer’s drugs and alcohol policy, and to look at your contract to see whether testing is mandatory. If possible, also find out what method of testing is used, and possibly even the company that provide the testing. (Oral swabs or urine pots will have the name of the company displayed on the side.) You can then look on the company’s website, or ring them, and ask whether they test for mephedrone and synthetic cathinones.

And if you interested in purchasing MCat drug tests, follow this link to my more recent post, MCat Testing.

For more information about MCat, it might be worth having a look at these resources:

– An excellent documentary called Legally High looks at new psychoactive substances, where they come from, the problems with legislating them, and the spectrum of drug use per se.

– Really interesting Wiki page about MCat, which charts its history, its researched neurochemical effects, and seems to me to under-report the negative effects and risks.

Frank’s generic drugs advice that slants to the negative, but also has links to help and support.

European Monitoring Centre For Drugs’ drug profile for synthetic cathinones, including mephedrone.

– My somewhat hopeless rant about my own experiences working with MCat users as a drugs worker – lets call it an industry insight.

Drugs policy fails – again: Postscript

Monday, August 5th, 2013

This one’s for the geeks and academics. I consider myself the former.

A mystery donor has sent me the full article for the research I wrote about recently (thanks, mystery donor), and it seems my theory about MCat was incorrect. What I didn’t deduce from the abstract was that the inverted correlation between the legal classification of cannabis and the number of people admitted to hospital with cannabis-related psychosis straddled not only the regrading from Class C to Class B, but also the earlier move from Class B to Class C. This method, known as a reversal design, references both the introduction and removal of the intervention – in this case, down-grading cannabis. The article states:

“There was a significantly increasing trend in cannabis psychosis admissions from 1999 to 2004. However, following the reclassification of cannabis from B to C in 2004, there was a significant change in the trend such that cannabis psychosis admissions declined to 2009. Following the second reclassification of cannabis back to class B in 2009, there was a significant change to increasing admissions… This study shows a statistical association between the reclassification of cannabis and hospital admissions for cannabis psychosis in the opposite direction to that predicted by the presumed relationship between the two.”

So my theory about unidentified MCat use causing an increase in psychosis admissions after cannabis was re-upgraded in 2009 doesn’t explain the previous decrease in admissions after it was downgraded in 2004. However, what became clear from reading the whole article is that the study relies entirely on participants being admitted under the criteria of ‘cannabis-related psychosis’. I query the validity of this data. In my experience, psychiatrists wang down any old shit on admission. As the article acknowledges, “This research has highlighted the need for research that explores the way that diagnoses of cannabis psychosis are made and the influences that operate on these decisions”. I would love to be the person to undertake that research, as from what I have witnessed, the pre-admission assessment usually goes something like is..

Psych: So you’ve been hearing voices?
Patient: Yes.
Psych: Have you ever used cannabis?
Patient: Yes.
Psych (writes): “Patient X is a drug user with a long history of cannabis use. Conclusion: cannabis-related psychosis.”

This diagnosis not only provides an excuse for a quick in/out treatment pathway and passing-of-the-book to substance misuse or dual diagnosis teams, it also puts the responsibility for the illness on the person being admitted. I will not mince my words – psychiatrists hate drug users. They perceive them with the same level of moral integrity that Conservative politicians do – drugs are bad. Those who use them are bad, and we need to police and punish all who use them. Certainly not treat them. Certainly not block up our hospital wards with them for more than a day or two. Get them in, give the Valium for a couple of days until they’re symptom-free, chuck them back out.

Drug users are perceived and accordingly treated by mental health services, and especially by those that rule and dominate these services, as time-wasters – impossible to assess, impossible to treat. I mean, how can I tell whether it is the condition or the substance causing the symptoms? And when I want to know the answer these questions, why won’t they just stop using drugs like I tell them to? Why aren’t they compliant?! And how am I suppose to use my tool of choice – dangerous, numbing drugs – to these liabilities when they have nowhere to live, no family member willing to supervise, and haven’t even got a lockable bathroom cabinet?!

Going back to the research, my original thought that maybe cannabis-related psychoses were in fact unmonitored MCat psychoses has been blown out the water, as overall inpatient psychotic admissions actually went down over time – not up as mephedrone and other new synthetic drugs became more commonly used. Again, this might be due to something completely different – such as psychiatric wards closing and so less space being available to admit people, or community teams such as Early Intervention or Assertive Outreach Home Treatment becoming more effective at keeping people out of hospital – but based on admission data alone, there is no trend here to suggest that psychotic incidences have increased since these new drugs became widely available.

If you consider my point above, you might feel, as I do, that this is less about the mental health of drug users and more about how mental health systems treat people who use drugs – but having spent twelve years banging this drug I am going to leave this point before I start bursting blood vessels.

Drug policy fails – again

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Another kick in the teeth this week for Theresa May and her determined squeal that drugs policy is working. After ignoring the research-based recommendations from a group of cross-party peers concerning decriminalisation, then developing selective deafness towards her drugs advisory board by banning khat, Theresa seems fixated on perpetuating the War On Drugs, whether anyone agrees with her or not.

It will be interesting, then, to see how she reacts to the news that cannabis psychosis admissions have actually increased since the drug was reclassified as a Class B substance. Yep, you’ve got us there, Theresa, you font of knowledge for all things street – clearly drugs policy is reducing use and minimising harm just as it should. Well done for sticking to your guns, and thank god those running the country know what they’re talking about. Phew.

Tottering Tory Totty aside, I have to admit this is a pretty bizarre finding. At no point did I think that reclassifying the drug would decrease the harm caused – why would it, it’s still illegal and that didn’t put people off before – but the inverted correlation between cannabis-related psychosis hospital admissions and reclassification of the drug is difficult to explain.

I have been pondering on this. Without subscribing to the Journal of Drug Policy (which is, I have to admit, surprisingly tempting, but takes money, of which I have little), I can’t see whether participants who suffered psychotic admissions had taken solely cannabis. My hunch is that something different may be afoot here. Rates of psychosis amongst my client-group have gone through the roof since MCat has surfaced, and I have heard similar reports from prisons regarding synthetic cannabanoids. I know that, until very recently, and certainly not within the confined dates of this longitudinal study, testing facilities for these drugs had not been developed – and even if they had, the average mental health ward would not have had access to them. So, my sneaky conclusion is that the increased rates of psychosis admission may have been due to the use of other substances – which were not only impossible to detect, but were also legal at the time and so potentially not reported or classified.

That is my suspicion. Just don’t tell Theresa. I can’t wait to see what shit she spins to explain away this one. Although, to be fair, I think she’s more likely to get a bad case of tinnitus than indulge in any scientific analysis. You keep on trucking girl, we’re all behind you (with a metaphorical spade).

What do heroin and Theresa May have in common?

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

So the United Nations are fully behind The War On Drugs, it seems. A report released this week states, somewhat apologetically, "We have to admit that, globally, the demand for drugs has not been substantially reduced and that some challenges exist in the implementation of the drug control system". However, it continues to maintain that the War On Drugs is the only way forward as "the problem will not be resolved if drugs are legalized. Organized crime is highly adaptive. It will simply move to other businesses that are equally profitable and violent".

Anyone who watched Prohibition recently will question this premise. The documentary tracks the careers of various criminal gangs, who went from scraping a living together to living in the lap of luxury when alcohol prohibition provided them with a gaping gap in the market. As one interviewee recalled, small-time crooks who would previously have had the odd driving job suddenly had more work than they could cope with. The demand for the product elevated criminals to celebrities. Makes you wonder exactly which market the UN think could generate the turnover of the international drugs trade, to keep the drug barons in the lifestyle to which they have become accustomed.

It will come as no surprise that the report identified significant changes in drug trends. Whilst heroin and cocaine use remain stable and predictable, new psychoactive substances being manufactured in Asia are the new big thing.

You don’t say. Quite aside from my highly-informative *ahem* pieces on MCat and PMA, the search terms that lead people to my blog give us an interesting insight as to the popularity of these new substances. Of the one hundred and thirty-four search terms I am able to see (and don’t worry, there is no way of me finding out which of you searched for which..), thirty-six of those contained the words MCat, meow meow or mephedrone. So over a quarter of people coming to my blog via an internet search engines were looking for information on MCat. This in comparison to just six searches for information relating to heroin.

However, possibly more worrying is that heroin is of equal interest to a somewhat more conservative issue. One which, unlike MCat, is not spread across the front pages. Yes, that’s right – my blog keeps receiving visits from people searching for images of Theresa May’s legs. Six of the pervs have been mortally gutted when their excited searches have revealed my somewhat drab and largely unsexy blog. Still, I am proud to incite flopsie in the dirty sods – and hope that maybe they learned something about drugs policy in the meantime.

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Austerity gives it Greek-style

Tuesday, May 21st, 2013

As most, I fear the fate of our beloved NHS under the Shithead Coalition. I have previously suggested that current Government policy (punish the poor for the mistakes of the minted) may well be leaving the door wide open to another heroin epidemic, and we already see the country flooded with novel psychoactive substances such as MCat. Well it seems that the nightmarish repeat of the 80s unravelling before our eyes in Britain is already taking place in Greece.

A new ‘cocaine of the poor’ is sweeping the poverty-stricken country. At €2 a hit, and reportedly a variant of crystal meth, ‘shisha’ sounds likely to me to be MCat by another name. Similarly, it brings aggression, violence, mental health problems, and burns users from the inside out. And as with MCat, it is cheap, easily accessible, and currently has ripe pickings of the desperate poor.

And who can blame people for wanting some escapism. With Greek youth unemployment apparently at 64% and a total of 400,000 families without any income at all (not to mention those who have jobs but aren’t getting paid, or are earning so little that they are unable to sustain their families), it is no surprise that suicides have increased by over 60%. Prostitution and homelessness have also massively increased – and I don’t know about you, but if I was reduced to living a brutal life on the streets, I think I’d prefer to be the nutter than the nutted, battered than the battered. Shisha use could be seen as a strategic line of defence.

In terms of the back-drop to the growing drug problem in Greece, I have been dipping in and out of an amazing blog (a really excellent example of why the Internet and its self-publishing is a wonderful thing) which challenges pretty much everything written in the mainstream media, and uncovers some fairly scary truths about the state of the world and those running it. The author, John Ward, writes about the ‘Troika’ – European Commission, International Monetary Fund, and European Central Bank – crippling Greece’s economy by forcing austerity measures. His comparisons between the Troika’s policies and those of the Fascists during the Second World War are genuinely frightening. John has exposed the corruption within the capitalist structures of Europe, and warns that, as in the past, ‘austerity’ can be a label given to international looting by those in power. And last time round, he says, when the Nazis stole Greek resources as part of ‘German reconstruction costs’, 40,000 Greeks starved to death.

So what does this mean for the Greek people now, and are there lessons we can learn? A new book, as reported in the Guardian this week, looks specifically at the health impact of austerity measures, and brings the tag line “Recessions can hurt, but austerity kills”. Strong words – but they are backed up with hard facts by this Yale, Oxford and Cambridge-educated expert in health economics, David Stuckler, who says that Greece is facing a public health disaster. With a reduction to the health budget of 40%, he quotes the Greek health minister, “These aren’t cuts with a scalpel, they’re cuts with a butcher’s knife”. And the cuts weren’t made under the guidance of the medical profession but by the financially-motivated Troika. They are not even representative of financial requirements being met by other countries, but are in fact much harsher than the cuts being imposed in other areas of Europe. It seems that John Ward’s shocking comparisons may be more accurate than is comfortable to acknowledge – and that the concepts of public health and indeed humanity appear to have been lost in a calculated move for money and power.

And the results for Greek health provision so far? Hospitals without surgical gloves, pharmacies without necessary medication, and seriously diminished resources to support the ever-increasing population of substance users. Stuckler has spoken to drug services in Athens to see how close they are to meeting World Health Organisation guidance that 200 clean needles should be made available for each IV drug user every year – and the current availability per person is 3. No wonder then that cases of HIV have shown a 200% increase (which is probably a conservative estimate given that testing is no doubt harder to access, and will not be helped by the increasingly desperate prostitution trade), and I dread to think of the rates of hepatitis C, venous damage and bacterial infections as people continue to use drugs without access to harm reduction advice and clean equipment.

As Professor Stuckler points out using multiple examples from history, destroying welfare, healthcare and employment programmes is never a positive move for the economy, aside from the human cost. A country that fails to invest in its people has not the strength to recover – very much like a person, there needs to be belief, hope and investment for recovery to take place. And if austerity was a treatment programme being clinically trialled, “It would have been discontinued” says Stuckler. “The evidence of its deadly side-effects – of the profound effects on economic choices on health – is overwhelming”.

So, just to bring it back home.. Cuts to public services: check. Increase in unemployment: check. Money being taken from the poor and disabled to pay for the rich: check. Increase of depression presentations (especially in the north of England where unemployment is highest and suicide is on the rise): check. Easy access to dangerous, damaging new drugs and a bumper opium crop due in from Afghanistan: check. Right then, we’re all set! Addiction is the new black, I’d get taxing the stuff if I were you, David.

Maurice the Feline (or MCat to his mates)

Saturday, November 17th, 2012

First there was J-Lo, then there was R-Pat, then SuBo (strange that Pete Doherty hasn’t jumped on the celebrity name abbreviation band-wagon..) – so when I overheard someone talking about MCat, I asked, “Is he on X-Factor or TOWIE?”.

Just kidding, of course. I’d heard about MCat, or mephedrone, before it was made illegal, referred to as a ‘legal high’. The term, legal high, is as misleading as it is out-dated, as not only does it point out the degree to which drug production now rapidly out-strips drug policy both in speed and guile, but is also value-laden with implications that ‘legal’ is synonymous with ‘safe’ – which of course, it is not. The Government just aren’t as fast or as clever as teenagers with laptops or the Chinese.

Referrals first started coming in for young adults taking mephedrone at parties – dropping out of college or work, refusing to leave the house, hearing voices, self-confidence obliterated. Now these were the tip of iceberg, we knew, as is generally the case with those who become so desperate that they consider presenting to a drugs service asking for help, and we knew that for every one referred, there were probably a hundred more using the substance without requiring assistance. But then a local teenager died, schools started to confiscate white powder from thirteen-year-olds caught taking it in school toilets, and presentations to GPs of worried parents with nervous-looking teenagers increased.

And then, oh god, the adult heavy-end drug-using population got hold of it. Now many of these are people who would pick up a tablet they had found on the floor of a public toilet and take it without knowing what it was. Some of them carry their prescribed meds out of the pharmacy, where they are supervised ingesting their dose of controlled medication by the pharmacist, in their black-toothed, gum-diseased mouths (no it’s not the methadone that makes your teeth rot, just BRUSH YOUR TEETH), and then spit it into the mouth of a waiting compatriot, either directly or via a used Coke can, for a couple of quid. So imagine the frenzy when a new drug, five times cheaper than heroin, scarily stronger than amphetamine, and more abundant than skunk weed, arrives in town. Remember the crystal meth epidemic the media howled about that never came (but that obliterated areas of America, Australia and New Zealand) – well I don’t want to scare-monger, but from where I’m standing, MCat looks like the UK’s crystal meth.

To call the white powder or crystalline substance being snorted, swallowed and injected ‘mephedrone’, ‘meow meow’ or ‘MCat’ is a dangerous generalisation – people in fact have no idea what it is that they are taking. Any term can only be used as an umbrella, and describes a white substance with stimulant effects which shows up on our current urine tests as amphetamine, methamphetamine (crystal meth), or neither. The truth is, no-one actually knows what they are putting into their bloodstream, and presentations and self-reports of experiences and side-effects vary wildly. When the UK Government picked up on the new drug and mephedrone was made illegal, the Chinese, who originally manufactured and distributed the drug in its initial form, got immediately wise to the change in UK legislation and the associated problems with importing the drug, and so changed the chemical composition slightly to get round this slight hitch in their marketing strategy. So our Government made the whole family of drugs, cathinones, illegal. There was, however, one rather huge problem – the Police had no way of testing for this new group of substances, and so amounts of white powder, once seized, even when accompanied with a confession of possession of mephedrone, were at times released, along with a somewhat sheepish drug dealer. (I’m pleased to report that drug testing facilities for MCat and associated substances have now been developed and laboratories are working with the Police to detect the drug.)

Imagine then being a drugs worker – as well as the client group’s ever-growing sense of rights without responsibility, the public sector cuts and all the associated inter-service bitching, and the lazy public-sector piss-takers sneering at you for being a mug for trying to make a difference – and an already difficult job starts to look somewhat less appetising. Then envisage that your drab, depressed, wet-lettuce clients (miserable and demotivating but at least manageable and consistent) start presenting wide-eyed, two stone lighter, covered in lumps, abscesses and what looks like chemical burns appearing from the inside out, and with a paranoid and aggressive approach to their social interactions. And you are trying to work with these people around a substance that you (and the rest of the field) know almost nothing about, can’t test for, and have no resources or points of reference to address for support or an evidence-base. One of your usually calm and polite clients smashes up his workshop with a hammer and then threatens to punch you; another genuinely nice guy with an alcohol problem and penchant for diazepam holds his mother at knife-point; the waiting room goes from looking like a queue outside a crematorium to an 80s football terrace.

I was around for the crack explosion, and I remember when all the heroin dealers started giving away a £10 rock with a bag of heroin to market their new product. Crack – scary stuff. But to be a crackhead – not a part-time, recreational user sharing a rock on payday, but a full-blown sell-your-arse type crackhead – you needed a serious income stream, and one that was rarely available outside of city centres with a sex-working industry. MCat – well that’s going for £10 a gram, less in some cases, and anecdotal reports indicate that people buy a fat bag and then are generous with how they share it around – a poor man’s cocaine, if you will, exchanging crisp £20 notes and smearless mirrors with grotty fivers and 1ml insulin syringes, and silicone implants with dodgy tattoos. So users can’t tell you how much they have used because they haven’t paid for it, they struggle to avoid it because it gets shoved underneath their noses every time they walk through a door, and they aren’t even sure what they’re taking because one bag will be euphoric while another bag will be prang. And what do drug users do when they haven’t slept for five days, they are ready for passing out because their stomachs are like walnuts, and they start seeing things and believing that everyone is trying to kill them? Take the world’s best antipsychotic – heroin. Ah the new wave is here my friends, get ready for it…

Hence, again, the summary of this entry is – I’ve had enough, I need a new job.

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